Canadians Living With Crohn’s Disease Benefit From Using Medical Marijuana

Marijuana, cannabis, marijuana, pot, weed – no matter what it is called, marijuana has been demonized for years as being an evil drug. Despite positive research from institutes of study in many countries, medical marijuana (not to be confused with cannabis for recreational use) is still a matter of strong debate. Oddly enough, the debate is hottest not between the general citizens of a country, but between the medical community and the respective governments.

In places where using medical marijuana is legal, studies are ongoing and often produce results that surprise many in the medical community. Others feel the results only serve to enforce Muha meds carts the belief that marijuana is not the demon plant propaganda has said it is.

Canadians and Crohn’s Disease
Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (related to Crohn’s disease) are serious problems for more over 170,000 Canadians. In fact, Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world. Sufferers may have persistent diarrhea, fever, cramping and abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding. Many lose their appetite, which can cause unhealthy weight loss, while some are plagued by nausea and vomiting. Crohn’s disease can affect the joints, liver, skin and eyes, as well, and commonly causes great fatigue.

Crohn’s disease is chronic; periods of remission are mixed with periods of intense activeness. Unfortunately, the medical community has been unable to find the cause of this disease, although they believe it has to do with an overactive immune system, initially triggered by outside influences. The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) states:

“Many scientists now believe that the interaction of an outside agent (such as a virus or bacterium) with the body’s immune system may trigger the disease, or that such an agent may cause damage to the intestinal wall, initiating or accelerating the disease process.”

They further state that, “Because there is no cure for Crohn’s disease, the goal of medical treatment is to suppress the inflammatory response. This step accomplishes two important goals: It allows the intestinal tissue to heal and it also relieves the symptoms of fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Once the symptoms are brought under control (this is known as inducing remission), medical therapy is used to decrease the frequency of disease flares (this is known as maintaining remission, or maintenance).” – CCFA

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